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Pregnancy Q&A

I think I’m pregnant. When should I see a doctor?

Missing your period by a day or two isn’t usually reason to suspect pregnancy, but if you’re about two weeks late, or you’ve tested positive with a home pregnancy test, you should see your doctor and be tested for an official diagnosis and begin your prenatal care.

If I live a healthy lifestyle do I really need to bother with prenatal care?

Prenatal care is one of those critical steps in keeping you and your baby healthy. We hope you have an uneventful pregnancy, so getting early and frequent care can help identify health problems early so they can be treated early. Our doctors can also offer important coaching on lifestyle habits, such as exercise and diet and avoiding risky behavior, as well as prescribing prenatal vitamins.

Should I talk to my doctor before getting pregnant?

It’s a good idea to schedule a consultation and exam with your doctor prior to getting pregnant. Your doctor can rule out or help you manage any preexisting medical conditions, such as diabetes, asthma, or high blood pressure. They can also evaluate prescription or over-the-counter medications and supplements you’re using to see if they’re contraindicated in pregnancy. You can also get started on a quality prenatal vitamin to provide all the nutrients to yourself and your future baby right away.

I’m afraid of gaining too much weight, how do I keep this under control?

Our doctors will let you know what is a healthy amount for you to gain and they’ll keep you on track through your trimesters. Every mother is different, depending on her starting weight and the size and stage of the baby’s development.

How often will I need to visit the doctor during pregnancy?

In the first and second trimester, you’ll likely see your doctor just once each month. After week 28 or 30, you’ll likely increase your visits to twice a month. At week 36 and up until your baby’s birth, you’ll have weekly visits. Moms older than 35 or those with known complications or risky pregnancies may be scheduled even more frequently.